Corn Drying Kiln

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Corn Drying Kiln

Postby Dave Mooney on Sat Jun 14, 2008 8:19 pm

Can anyone point me to or supply an image or images of Corn Drying Kilns. All periods considered. And I mean reconstructions or artist impressions please. I can find tons on dig photos on-line but nothing to show how the organic top side may have looked.

We're supposed to have one at work. That is, they planned to install one in the Cragg at some point but never got to it. I'd like to understand how they work and what's involved in making one before I go and submit a proposal to build one.

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Re: Corn Drying Kiln

Postby Dave Mooney on Mon Jun 16, 2008 3:09 pm

This one was in Ferrycarrig all the time. tut!

Image

Thanks Bill.

Here's a dig shot
Image
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Re: Corn Drying Kiln

Postby tri on Mon Jun 16, 2008 3:27 pm

Sorry Dave!

Most of the excavated examples I can think of are that keyhole shape that you've illustrated but as you said, its the superstructure thats the problem. I've come across a few references to the use of slate tiles to form the 'roof' of the flue section that might be a bit more permanent than the clay/wicker structure most reconstructions suggest.

Will get some drawings and references to you soon as I can.
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Re: Corn Drying Kiln

Postby oleg on Mon Jun 16, 2008 6:58 pm

Hello Dave,

I would make it similar to the contemporary smoking sheds.

Image

Roof above the fire should be more massive, similar to the one used in stoves. Flue section is less important(could be covered with boards of wood), temperatures are lower. Length of flue section depends on fire and slope angle, in smoking sheds it's something like 4 meters with angle up to 30%. Bigger angle - better flow.

Wicker roof is what I can suggest for working area.

It could be improved by several layers of wicker roof, screen for protection from wind around and roof under the corn/grain.
Last edited by oleg on Mon Jun 16, 2008 8:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Corn Drying Kiln

Postby Donal on Mon Jun 16, 2008 7:55 pm

This is from Scotland hope it helps.
http://ads.ahds.ac.uk/catalogue/adsdata/PSAS_2002/pdf/vol_118/118_219_229.pdf
Question, at this time around 1000 A.D. this would be used for grain not corn? :?:
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Re: Corn Drying Kiln

Postby Dave Mooney on Mon Jun 16, 2008 9:43 pm

Thanks guys, keep it coming :)

Hi Donal,
In the UK and Ireland the word 'Corn' was used to mean 'Grain'. Corn laws of the 1800's etc.
Corn is actually Sorghum (eg. Sorghum bicolor .L) Basics at http://www.vurv.cz/altercrop/sorghum.html

The term was brought to the American continent by the new settlers. When they met the Natives making bread from maze they called it 'Indian Corn'. The Indian bit got dropped so now we all know Maze as Corn as well.

By Corn I/We do mean Cereal and Grains etc.

Oleg,
I'm thinking that smoking the grain is to be avoided and it's just warm air that is needed. Cheers for the spec on the smoke hut though as I plan to make one of those as well. ;)

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Re: Corn Drying Kiln

Postby the_power on Mon Jun 16, 2008 11:09 pm

I thought the english word Corn was derived from Quern - i.e. anything that could be ground on a quern-stone.

It seems I'm wrong. It comes from the old German 'small seed'. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=corn

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Re: Corn Drying Kiln

Postby oleg on Tue Jun 17, 2008 7:37 am

Ok, Dave, I think I have another idea for making it less smoky :D .
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Re: Corn Drying Kiln

Postby Dave Mooney on Tue Jun 17, 2008 8:25 am

Oleg, Some of the 'Key hole' type dryers seem to be a double key hole, one inside the other. This creates a flue around the pit. I'm thinking that this may keep the smoke off the grain in some way while still creating a convection current.

John, Funny how words get attached to stuff. Sorgham is a small seed. Looks to have the smallest seed of the grass type crops and looks more clustered. The rest seem to grow in chunky rows, like milti-row barley etc. Love that ethymology dictionary!!
So our 'corn' is oats? Makes sense.

corn (1)
"grain," O.E. corn, from P.Gmc. *kurnam "small seed," from PIE base *ger- "wear away" (O.Slav. zruno "grain," Skt. jr- "to wear down," L. granum). The sense of the O.E. word was "grain with the seed still in" rather than a particular plant. Locally understood to denote the leading crop of a district. Restricted to corn on the cob in America (originally Indian corn, but the adjective was dropped), usually wheat in England, oats in Scotland and Ireland, while korn means "rye" in parts of Germany. Introduced to China by 1550, it thrived where rice did not grow well and was a significant factor in the 18th century population boom there. Cornflakes first recorded 1907. Corned beef so called for the "corns" or grains of salt with which it is preserved. Cornrows as a hair style is first recorded 1971. Corny "old-fashioned" is Amer.Eng. 1932, originally, "something appealing to country folk."
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Re: Corn Drying Kiln

Postby oleg on Tue Jun 17, 2008 8:38 pm

Here it is.
Image

Initial flue is for decreasing temperature of the air. Working area is a big round frying pan, though with lower temperatures:).
Smoke goes to the hole(flue is better) on the opposite side of the pan.
B is better because it makes even distribution of temperatures, so it's low maintenance solution, no need to stir corn often :D .

Hard to say about materials needed for construction. All depends on temperatures/how fast it should be. May be it's enough to use wood + clay. In other case construction could be similar to the kiln or stove. Hope you'll find good answers in archaeology.

Anyway, I can help with real kiln next time I'm in Ireland ;)
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