To Hell or Barbados, Book Review

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To Hell or Barbados, Book Review

Postby finnobreanan on Thu Dec 30, 2010 4:17 pm

I just finished Sean O'Callaghan's book, To Hell or Barbados: The Ethnic Cleansing of Ireland, published in 2000. The book examines the policy of Cromwell to sell into slavery Irish Torries; those who refused to transplant to Connaght; idlers; former soldiers; and young girls and boys, an estimated 50,000 slaves sent to Barbados, Jamaica, and Virginia in the mid 1600s. The author did very good and exhausting research, but did not use footnotes, but has an excellent bibliography. This book was a real eye-opener for me and revealed another side of horror to the reign of Cromwell and his forces in Ireland. Sadly, the policy was continued after the restoration of Charles II for a brief period. This is indeed a very sad chapter in history. I highly recommend this book to any student of Irish History.
Finn O'Breanan
Wood Kerne

"...The O'Brennans, a sept of thieves without any right or title, ... were a perpetual disturbance to the peace of the county,"
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Re: To Hell or Barbados, Book Review

Postby kevin714 on Thu Dec 30, 2010 10:12 pm

finnobreanan wrote:I just finished Sean O'Callaghan's book, To Hell or Barbados: The Ethnic Cleansing of Ireland, published in 2000. The book examines the policy of Cromwell to sell into slavery Irish Torries; those who refused to transplant to Connaght; idlers; former soldiers; and young girls and boys, an estimated 50,000 slaves sent to Barbados, Jamaica, and Virginia in the mid 1600s. The author did very good and exhausting research, but did not use footnotes, but has an excellent bibliography. This book was a real eye-opener for me and revealed another side of horror to the reign of Cromwell and his forces in Ireland. Sadly, the policy was continued after the restoration of Charles II for a brief period. This is indeed a very sad chapter in history. I highly recommend this book to any student of Irish History.


Thanks Scot, I'm going to add that to my list. I grew up knowing about this bit of history and people are always surprised when I tell them of this little known fact of history, I always thought the number was much higher. I think for a time it was open season on irish peasants they could just capture them and sell them, if that is correct there would be no way to get an accurate figure, I can't remember what source I got that from off the top of my head. Anything in the book about that?

I just received Katherine Simms, From Kings to Warlords and The Twlight Light Lords by Richard Berleth from amazon.
Kevin Patrick Molloy
"The Prince of Firceall of the ancient sword is O'Molloy of the freeborn name, full power was granted to him and he held his country uncontrolled" O'Dugain(d.1372 AD)
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Re: To Hell or Barbados, Book Review

Postby finnobreanan on Sat Jan 01, 2011 8:57 pm

Kevin,

Yes, the book mentions these catchers who were paid by the head for slaves, mostly to Dutch Slave shippers at Cork and other southern port cities. The practice ended when it was discovered that they were also catching and selling English colonists in Ireland into slavery!
There are no accurate numbers, but some estimates range as high as 100,000 Irish slaves.
Finn O'Breanan
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"...The O'Brennans, a sept of thieves without any right or title, ... were a perpetual disturbance to the peace of the county,"
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Re: To Hell or Barbados, Book Review

Postby consmiles on Sat Feb 05, 2011 7:58 pm

Hi,
it's a great book, exposing the British strategy of displacement as part of their genocide plan. They even invented a new phrase for slavery so it wouldn't sound too bad... Curious how none of my history or archaeology teachers ever mentioned this imperial policy.
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Con
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