Amazing footage Ireland 1920

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Amazing footage Ireland 1920

Postby bannerman on Sat Sep 19, 2009 10:22 pm

Hey guys. Even if you havent the slightest interest in doing War Of Independence re-enactment you have to watch this!

http://www.waterfordcountymuseum.org/ex ... 1CFC6702EA

Its period footage of two men in Dungarvan Co. Waterford who had been caught taking down a British Flag on Armistace day 1920 being forced by armed British troops from the West Kent Regiment to parade through the town with another flag to replace the one they had removed. Its absolutely incrediable footage. Ive just watched it over and over about 9 times.

In the second last shot keep an eye out for the two RIC Auxialiaries (Auxies) who are following along behind the British patrol with webly revolvers in hand.

Now that I know theres film footage this good available for the period Im going to kick the next person who turns up at a gig in shite kit so hard my toes will bleed!!!

Enjoy
Padraig
http://www.warofindependence.net/

"Is doigh linn gur mor iad na daoine mora mar atamuid fein ar ar nglunaibh. - Eirimis!!!"
Jim Larkin 1913
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Re: Amazing footage Ireland 1920

Postby mock on Sat Sep 19, 2009 10:53 pm

thats amazing footage,
god bless you padraig.
keep your boots polished ;)
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Re: Amazing footage Ireland 1920

Postby bannerman on Sun Sep 20, 2009 1:04 am

Keep my boots polished Ha!
Have another look at the footage, the West Kents are marching in column and in step - the Auxies behind them are just sauntering along. When the first Auxie needs to get the British Army Officers attention does he march up to him, spring to attention, salute and ask permission to speak? No he just strolls up from the side grabs the sleve of the officers uniform and starts a chat.

So if the Tans and Auxies didnt feel the need for farmalities when walking and adressing officers Id say their boots were let go to rag order the odd time as well.

Padraig
http://www.warofindependence.net/

"Is doigh linn gur mor iad na daoine mora mar atamuid fein ar ar nglunaibh. - Eirimis!!!"
Jim Larkin 1913
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Re: Amazing footage Ireland 1920

Postby museumtom on Sat Sep 26, 2009 8:22 am

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Re: Amazing footage Ireland 1920

Postby euryalus on Sat Oct 10, 2009 7:54 pm

The relaxed "body language" of the RIC Auxiliary alongside the British army officer suggests that he regarded himself as a man of equal status to the soldier - which is surely what we would expect of an RIC "Cadet", who would have been an officer with a good war record. I doubt if an ordinary RIC constable would have dared to show such familiarity with his "betters".

It is also interesting to note that the Auxiliary is wearing a short cloak or cape - I wonder if this would have been an army cape or a dark green police cape? When portrayed in films or on TV the Black & Tans are normally shown wearing trench coats.
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Re: Amazing footage Ireland 1920

Postby euryalus on Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:48 pm

I had a funny dream the other night. I dreamt that I was looking out of a window and an RIC Auxiliary came walking down the street. He was, at least at first, a re-enactor, but the dream suddenly changed gear and it all became "real". What struck me as odd about the dream was the clarity with which I could identify the various components of the uniform and kit, which was, basically, dark green or black trousers, a mid-blue Tam o'Shanter, a white fleece jacket and cross bandoliers. I am now wondering if this particular permutation of the uniform was ever worn?
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Re: Amazing footage Ireland 1920

Postby mountcashel on Mon Jan 11, 2010 1:39 pm

Hi all, keep up the good work.
Re Auxie "uniform"... a few variations exist.
The first contingent can be seen inspected in London prior to deployment to Ireland dressed in British army officers tunic and breeches, with Tam O Shanter hat and RIC insignia, very much spit and polish in evidence as would befit a PR exercise.
Auxliaries can be seen in Tim Pat Coogans "Civil war"book, undergoing weapons inspection and with a number of high ranking RIC officers, and they are clad in enlisted mans service dress tunic, khaki tam o shanter and Officers breeches.
And theres also a uniform that seems to be police navy/blue in evidence,seen in one case worn by the naval/maritime unit employed in the Dublin port area.
And of couse you can see examples of all combinations above being worn in many photos.
Travelling round in Crossley tenders and open topped cars called for more practical combinations, as seen in the well known but oft miscaptioned photo taken outside union quay barracks.
No matter what combination was worn however, the tam o shanter was the most visible identifier of the Auxiliary, many films, such as Michael Collins and The wind that shakes the Barley have got this wrong by mixing up Auxiliaries and Black and Tans, the Black and tans wore the standard RIC mans peaked police cap and no other type. I think Dan Breens book shows a squad of tans attired in standard RIC kit outside their barracks.
Only the Auxiliaries wore the "Tam".
Good work, Padraig, and yes indeed theres no excuse for re enactors of this period to get it wrong now, not that there ever was, so please people, no more safety boots, shiny slacks, small modern "farmer caps"or the like, le do thoil!
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Re: Amazing footage Ireland 1920

Postby Cpl Flood on Thu Jan 28, 2010 5:22 pm

Thats a great piece of footage.Its actually quite clear too.
Its really immediate.
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Re: Amazing footage Ireland 1920

Postby Dez on Sat Feb 06, 2010 6:38 pm

Hello membere,
I am a newcomer to this forum, and i would like to say thanks to bannerman, for posting this film clip, this is live history at its best. Photographs are great but nothing beats live film. Was this done for the camera or was the camera just a spectator, as far as the uniforms are concerned that doesn't matter. Not much security on the part of the soldiers, nobody watching the crowd, men leaning on rifles etc, although there are a few nervous glances over the shoulders. The only rifleman doing anything right, is no. 2 Auxie in the lane bringing up the rear, with rifle at the ready (probably with one up the spout and the safety on). If this piece was re-enacted, how close could you come to the real thing. I wonder what Company the Auxies belonged to, the one carrying the revolver appears to have driving goggles around his neck, his Crossley and the rest of his men must not be far away. I don't know of any Auxies stationed in Dungarvan, if anyone else knows different, let us know. Thanks again.
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Re: Amazing footage Ireland 1920

Postby bannerman on Fri Feb 19, 2010 1:08 am

No Auxies stationed in Dungarvin to the best of my knowledge - The best book on the subject of Waterford and Dungarvin in the period is Terry O Reilly's "Rebel Heart - George Lennon Flying Column Commander." I would presume the Auxies in the film were just passing through or transporting/collecting prisoners. The footage was definitely not re-created for the newsreel unlike so much other footage from the time. I first saw it when it was shown at a conference in Dungarvin on the War Of Independence in Waterford. The Full facts about the removal of the flag, the names of those involved and period newspaper reports of the event were included in the presentation accompanying the film

Padraig
http://www.warofindependence.net/

"Is doigh linn gur mor iad na daoine mora mar atamuid fein ar ar nglunaibh. - Eirimis!!!"
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