Greetings from Himself

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Re: Greetings from Himself

Postby Caoimhin on Fri Jun 29, 2012 5:18 am

Na Fianna Éireann wrote:
Caoimhin wrote:also, I want to call my household House fire head for some reason, I don't know why. I looked up fire (tine) and head (ceann) in irish and was wondering would it be Tine Ceann or Ceann Tine, or would it be something else all together?



House fire head does not really read right, the House hold of the Fire Heads would read better, as tigh means house hold ie Tigh Mháirtín means Martin's house / house hold, if you are talking about warriors then Aed is a better word to use pronounced as (e) as it means the flame of a warrior that which burns within that gives him the fight within, or Cineal meaning type or people of Cineal Uí Niall , the people of Niall.


Would it be read as House hold of the Fire Heads? If so, how would that be spelled properly. My ability to read and write Irish like most Americans is terrible, but I am trying to learn.
"Michael began to call out a warning for Caoimhin, O’Donnell and MacCarraig to move up when it was cut short by a sickening smack of a dart piercing his breast." an excerpt from 'Maitiu's Stories'
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Re: Greetings from Himself

Postby Billy on Fri Jun 29, 2012 11:04 pm

Martin has opened a bit of a can of worms here.

Tigh does indeed mean house, not household. Cenél (accent on the second e) is an old Irish word meaning 'kindred, or tribe".
Muintir is another such word, in fact a common and still-used word meaning household in odern Irish. It has another meaning, that of community or gropu in older Irish, but has come to evolve familiar or kin-group associations.

Áed (accent on initial a) or Aed is an Old Irish word meaning fire, and does seem to have some deeper associations. It was also used in compound words, so a construction like 'Cenél Chinnáed' would scan quite well in Old Irish. 'Muintir Chinnaodh' would be a more modern rendition, but lacks the aliteration of the older construction.

Thoughts?
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Re: Greetings from Himself

Postby Caoimhin on Sat Jun 30, 2012 8:18 am

Cenél Chinnáed. I'll have to practice pronouncing that. Basically I want this group to reenact everyday life from the mid to the end of the 16th century. I want it to encompass peasants, skilled workers, nobles, military and legal(brehons) groups by (and here is my catchphrase when I try to pull people in) mentoring and teaching of actual arts, both martial and social, sciences, and cultural traditions we hope to show our audience that the Irish were more than the stereotypes that drink constantly, yell begorrah and hunt for leprechauns.

When it all come down to it. I just want to get everything right so that way I don't look like an idiot by portraying thing incorrectly. even spelling.

My Character is a Connaught man. An Ó Conchobhair Sligigh to be exact and my Fiancée is going to play a Mag Congail from Dún na nGall. I'm also going to encourage people to play roles like the Earls of Desmond, Ormond and Thomond, Hugh O' Donnell, Gerald Fitzgerald and Shane O' Neill. I don't know if that answered the question as to what my thoughts were about that or if it just opened an ever bigger can of worms :oops:
"Michael began to call out a warning for Caoimhin, O’Donnell and MacCarraig to move up when it was cut short by a sickening smack of a dart piercing his breast." an excerpt from 'Maitiu's Stories'
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Re: Greetings from Himself

Postby finnobreanan on Sun Jul 01, 2012 3:01 am

Billy wrote:Martin has opened a bit of a can of worms here.

Tigh does indeed mean house, not household. Cenél (accent on the second e) is an old Irish word meaning 'kindred, or tribe".
Muintir is another such word, in fact a common and still-used word meaning household in odern Irish. It has another meaning, that of community or gropu in older Irish, but has come to evolve familiar or kin-group associations.

Áed (accent on initial a) or Aed is an Old Irish word meaning fire, and does seem to have some deeper associations. It was also used in compound words, so a construction like 'Cenél Chinnáed' would scan quite well in Old Irish. 'Muintir Chinnaodh' would be a more modern rendition, but lacks the aliteration of the older construction.

Thoughts?

I'd go with Billy's suggestion. "Cenel" is often found in descriptions of households/tribes. Besides, he's our resident expert on the Irish language. :D
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Re: Greetings from Himself

Postby Caoimhin on Sun Jul 01, 2012 8:01 am

what would the phonetic spelling be for Chinnáed. for some reason(and I know it isn't right) I keep pronouncing it like Sinéad.
"Michael began to call out a warning for Caoimhin, O’Donnell and MacCarraig to move up when it was cut short by a sickening smack of a dart piercing his breast." an excerpt from 'Maitiu's Stories'
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Re: Greetings from Himself

Postby Billy on Mon Jul 02, 2012 10:51 pm

It's very close to Sinéad, but instead of starting with an 'Sh' sound, it's more like a hiss at the back of your throat, like a goose makes.

Hchinéad maybe?

It's a quick sound, no longer than the s in Sinéad.

Think of the goose, and the sound will come!
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Re: Greetings from Himself

Postby Caoimhin on Tue Jul 03, 2012 2:10 am

Billy wrote:It's very close to Sinéad, but instead of starting with an 'Sh' sound, it's more like a hiss at the back of your throat, like a goose makes.

Hchinéad maybe?

It's a quick sound, no longer than the s in Sinéad.

Think of the goose, and the sound will come!

Thanks
"Michael began to call out a warning for Caoimhin, O’Donnell and MacCarraig to move up when it was cut short by a sickening smack of a dart piercing his breast." an excerpt from 'Maitiu's Stories'
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Re: Greetings from Himself

Postby Billy on Wed Jul 04, 2012 8:30 am

I just realised, I made an omission.

The second word should be in the genitive case,( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genitive_case )

so it should read Muintir Chinnaoidh, which would render the prononciation of the end of the word a little different.

Instead of rhyming with Sinéad, the second word would sound a bit like Chin -ee- ud, with the initial ch sound being that goose hiss I was talking about.
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Re: Greetings from Himself

Postby Caoimhin on Wed Jul 04, 2012 2:25 pm

Crazy, Thank you though.
"Michael began to call out a warning for Caoimhin, O’Donnell and MacCarraig to move up when it was cut short by a sickening smack of a dart piercing his breast." an excerpt from 'Maitiu's Stories'
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